Tim Cattera/MiLB.com

Tim Cattera/MiLB.com

28. Ian Gardeck

Ian Gardeck is the most recent of the Giants' Tommy John surgery victims. He'll miss all of the 2016 season after really breaking out a year ago with San Jose. He struck out 104 in 86 innings while hurling 100 mile per hour heaters at California League hitters. The need to reach back for every pitch has pushed Gardeck to display a lack of command, much like Ray Black. Gardeck is a two-pitch guy, utilizing a mid-80s slider to keep batters off balance. Here's to hoping his recovery is going smoothly and brings him back healthy for 2017.

2015 Stats // ETA: 2017

Conner Penfold/Giant Potential

Conner Penfold/Giant Potential

29. Johneshwy Fargas

To start things off, this Puerto Rican speedster has an 80-grade first name. Pronounced "joan-ESH-wee," Johneshwy Fargas lit up the base paths in 2015 with the Augusta GreenJackets, stealing 59 bases while batting .278 with 114 hits in 102 games. Fargas is a gap-to-gap type guy that is looking for second base on every base hit, and third base on every double. He shows okay plate discipline, but is overall still a work-in-progress at the plate. Still just 21, Fargas should mature and grow immensely over the next two years and could evolve into a fifth outfielder. His defense and speed are currently his best assets, though his fielding abilities won't blow you away.

2016 Stats // VIDEO // ETA: 2019

Conner Penfold/Giant Potential

Conner Penfold/Giant Potential

30. D.J. Snelten

Like Joan Gregorio, D.J. Snelten is 6'7" and utilizes his height to attack hitters from a 3/4 arm slot. Hailing from the University of Minnesota, Snelten reaches back for a mid-90s sinking fastball that typically sits between 90 and 93. He drops any where from 10 to 15 miles per hour when throwing his changeup, which he uses against right-handers. The offering to lefties is a low-to-mid 80s slider that is actually more vertical than side-to-side. His command is solid, though certainly not as polished as Andrew Suarez or Ty Blach from the left side. Most scouts tend to see Snelten as a reliever moving forward, but for now, he owns a 3.01 ERA in the minors since being drafted.

2016 Stats // VIDEO // ETA: 2019