Jared Ravich/MiLB.com

Jared Ravich/MiLB.com

17. Bryan Reynolds

The San Francisco Giants began to stockpile outfield prospects in the 2016 draft, grabbing three in their first five selections. It all began with 59th overall Bryan Reynolds from Vanderbilt University, who can switch hit and play all three outfield spots. Touted as a four-tool player, Reynolds has raw power from both sides that could translate to 15-20 home runs at higher levels, as well as a reputation for being quite disciplined at the plate. His above-average defense should keep him in center field for most of his minor league career, but of course that means the corners are where he could actually break into the big leagues.

2016 Stats // VIDEO // ETA: 2019

Tim Cattera/MiLB.com

Tim Cattera/MiLB.com

18. Aramis Garcia

San Francisco has Buster Posey and Andrew Susac, and yet they still snagged Aramis Garcia in 2014's second round. Garcia struggled in 2014, splitting time between Arizona and Salem-Keizer, and improved a bit in 2015. He clubbed 15 home runs and 15 doubles, slugging .467 for the GreenJackets. This offensive-upsided catcher shows good plate discipline and tracking of pitches, and displays pop times around two seconds from behind the dish. Everything defensively about Garcia appears average at best, and because of that, it will certainly be his bat speed and raw power that potentially propel him to the major leagues as a likely backup catcher. He's likely done for the remainder of the 2016 season after sustaining facial fractures sliding into second base.

2016 Stats // VIDEO // ETA: 2018

Rudy C. Jones/MiLB.com

Rudy C. Jones/MiLB.com

19. Chase Johnson

The former Cal Poly closer, Chase Johnson has worked as a pro on refining his wind-up while being groomed into a starter. He had been taking the mound as one since he was drafted in the third round in 2013, but the organization moved him back into the bullpen in late May. After 18 starts in San Jose a year ago produced a 2.92 ERA and strikeout-per-inning type stuff, Johnson was promoted to Richmond, which is where he broke camp this year. So far it's been a grind for Johnson in Double-A, averaging a walk every other inning, though his strikeout totals haven't changed. Johnson's breakout performance was a 14-strikeout, complete-game shutout in his final start in San Jose — a game where his fastball topped out at 98. Mostly, Johnson is in the 92-95 range.

2016 Stats // VIDEO // ETA: 2018

Ben Sandstrom/MiLB.com

Ben Sandstrom/MiLB.com

20. Steven Duggar

The emergence of Steven Duggar, as well as the drafting of three outfielders in their top five picks in 2016, has the San Francisco Giants' farm of outfielders suddenly going from desolate to thriving. Duggar skipped Augusta, much like Austin Slater, and joined the San Jose Giants for the 2016 season where he displayed above-average contact, power, and plate discipline. Midway through the year, Duggar led the entire Giants' farm in walks, was tied for the most triples, and was in the top-10 in wOBA and wRC+. Duggar is known for his plus speed, both offensively and defensively, but hasn't utilized it on the base paths as a pro. Duggar, along with Chris Shaw and C.J. Hinojosa, were all promoted to Double-A on the same day (June 29).

2016 Stats // VIDEO // ETA: 2018