Conner Penfold/Giant Potential

Conner Penfold/Giant Potential

21. Chris Stratton 

Chris Stratton hasn't quite panned out the way most people would have expected the 2012 first-round pick to thus far. His 2014 season, spent in San Jose and Richmond, culminated in a 4.80 ERA and 1.48 WHIP in 122 innings. He's been in the Sacramento rotation since mid-2015, and has produced similar numbers, but he's been trending up over the last year. His advertised 93-95 mph fastball in college turned into high-80s to low-90s, and his ability to spot it has benefited him. Scouts waver back and forth between calling Stratton a potential rotation or bullpen arm, but as of now, he remains in the starting role capable of throwing 90-plus pitches with a decent four-pitch arsenal. Many praised his 2017 spring showing, and scouts even had Stratton up to 94 in the Fall League.

2016 Stats // VIDEO // ETA: 2017

Jared Ravich/MiLB.com

Jared Ravich/MiLB.com

22. Melvin Adon

There was a good amount of hype surrounding Melvin Adon at the beginning of the 2016 season, and for good reason. Talk of a 100-mph starter is always exciting, and though he hadn't been posting triple digits regularly, if at all, in 2016 with the Salem-Keizer Volcanoes, there's certainly a lot to like about this raw arm. Fangraphs had him 94-97 in May with a mid-80s slider, featuring some nice horizontal movement, and an upper-80s, below-average changeup. Signed as a 20-year-old in 2014, Adon skipped the Arizona League after one year in the Dominican Republic. He's a project with a ton of potential at this point, but the Giants' farm system is known for handling these situations with ease. The most updated info on Adon comes from Baseball America's J.J Cooper, who reported an encouraging bit about Adon's delivery becoming more simplified and still creeping around 100 mph.

2016 Stats // VIDEO // ETA: 2020

Tim Cattera/MiLB.com

Tim Cattera/MiLB.com

23. Dylan Davis

The former Oregon State pitcher seems to be finally tapping into the power scouts have mentioned frequently. A month into the 2016 season, Dylan Davis was slugging .536 in the South Atlantic League, and eventually promoted to San Jose where he hit nine home runs in his first 26 games in the California League. The year concluded with Davis tallying 26 home runs, a .521 slugging percentage, and a 238 ISO — the second highest in the organization behind only Jarrett Parker. Davis plays the corner outfield, and has an absolute cannon — once able to hit 97 with the Beavers. Like Mac Williamson, the pitcher-turned-outfielder, Davis' arm strength is his greatest asset, though he's bringing the bat around, too. He did, in fact, win the Cape Cod home run derby in 2012. Davis has average defensive skills and below average speed.

2016 Stats // VIDEO // ETA: 2019

Andy Grosh/MiLB.com

Andy Grosh/MiLB.com

24. Miguel Gomez

No question the breakout prospect of the 2016 year for the Giants, switch-hitting corner infielder/catcher Miguel Gomez has been a hitting machine since he was signed by San Francisco back in 2011. Aside from a rough 2012 season in the Dominican Summer League, Gomez has hit over .300 each season since, producing more power from the left side while compiling a slightly higher average from the right side. Gomez didn't play catcher at all in 2016 and instead flopped between first and third base. Gomez works with a compact stroke and uses all parts of the field, and best of all, he rarely strikes out. He has a career strikeout rate of 12.2 percent, but it was even lower at 11.3 in 2016.

2016 Stats // VIDEO // ETA: 2019