Ralph Thompson/MiLB.com

Ralph Thompson/MiLB.com

21. Ty Blach

Ty Blach's ability to command the zone has always been apparent. The left-hander averaged two walks per nine innings his final year at Creighton, then struck out an astounding 117 hitters to just 18 walks over 130.1 innings in his debut season with the San Jose Giants in 2013. Those numbers didn't budge much since in his promotion to Double-A the next year, or in his Triple-A debut, but the amount of hard contact off Blach in Sacramento drove his ERA into the mid-four range. Blach features two fastballs, with the four-seamer topping at 94, a plus changeup with good fade away from right-handed hitters, and a slider.

2016 Stats // VIDEO // ETA: 2017

Tim Cattera/MiLB.com

Tim Cattera/MiLB.com

22. Dylan Davis

The former Oregon State pitcher seems to be finally tapping into the power scouts have mentioned frequently. A month into the 2016 season, and Dylan Davis was slugging .536 in the South Atlantic League, and eventually promoted to San Jose, where he hit nine home runs in his first 26 games in the California League. Davis plays the corner outfield, and has an absolute cannon — once able to hit 97 with the Beavers. Like Mac Williamson, the pitcher-turned-outfielder, Davis' arm strength is his greatest asset, though he's bringing the bat around, too. He did, in fact, win the Cape Cod home run derby in 2012. Davis has average defensive skills and below average speed.

2016 Stats // VIDEO // ETA: 2018

Andy Grosh/MiLB.com

Andy Grosh/MiLB.com

23. Hunter Cole

Hunter Cole seemed to have regressed since his promotion to Richmond last season, that was until he destroyed June with seven home runs and 10 doubles, culminating in a .653 slugging percentage. While teammate Austin Slater had success against Double-A pitching, Cole took a while to get into his groove, but is now slashing .274/.330/.4333 as of mid-July. Moving forward, scouts like Cole's bat speed and power, as well as his ability to play many defensive positions. In year three, he's played every spot on the diamond except shortstop and catcher.

2016 Stats // VIDEO // ETA: 2018

Tim Cattera/MiLB.com

Tim Cattera/MiLB.com

24. C.J. Hinojosa

This University of Texas product may have been the most talked about position player in the Giants' organization during minor league spring training. He began to live up to that hype quickly, leading the California League in batting average through the first 30 games with the San Jose Giants. C.J. Hinojosa wont impress you with raw power or quick bat speed, but rather good hand-eye, strong forearms, and the ability to go to all fields with his good extension. Defensively, Hinojosa has looked lackluster thus far at shortstop, averaging an error every fifth game or so, though I'm sure this bad stretch will prove to be a fluke.

2016 Stats // VIDEO // ETA: 2018