Andy Grosh/MiLB.com

Andy Grosh/MiLB.com

25. Cory Taylor

Cory Taylor didn't seem to run into any problems pitching in the South Atlantic League in his first full season. He quickly built a reputation of throwing six or more innings with 90 or more pitches on a regular basis, while striking out just over one batter per inning on average. The big righty sits comfortably between 88 and 93 miles per hour with his two and four-seam fastballs, and has been known to reach back to touch mid-90s. He throws two types of breaking balls, but most often a slider in the low-80s with sharp bite. Taylor messes with a changeup, but is mostly a two-pitch guy. The former Dallas Baptist ace is definitely a prospect on the rise, making the Double-A Flying Squirrels roster to begin 2017.

2017 Stats // VIDEO // ETA: 2018

Conner Penfold/Giant Potential

Conner Penfold/Giant Potential

26. D.J. Snelten

Like Joan Gregorio, D.J. Snelten is 6'7" and utilizes his height to attack hitters from a 3/4 arm slot. He reaches back for a mid-90s sinker that typically sits between 92 and 94. He drops anywhere from 10 to 15 miles per hour when throwing his changeup, which he uses against right-handers. The offering to lefties is a low-to-mid 80s slider that is actually more vertical than side-to-side. His command is solid, though not as polished as Andrew Suarez or Ty Blach from the left side. Most scouts tended to see Snelten as a reliever moving forward, and they were right as the Giants moved him into the pen at the beginning of July 2016. Snelten has more than thrived in the new role, using his repertoire to produce over 70% ground balls, high strikeout rates, and low walk rates with Richmond and Sacramento.

2017 Stats // VIDEO // ETA: 2018

Tim Cattera/MiLB.com

Tim Cattera/MiLB.com

27. Ryan Howard

Ryan Howard got bumped up to San Jose alongside the likes of Reynolds and Quinn to begin the 2017 season — a typical Giants move when the organization is impressed with a high-round college pick. Howard was pretty average in his debut in Salem-Keizer, posting a 92 wRC+ and .683 OPS in 246 plate appearances. Encouraging was his sub-10 percent strikeout rate. He took that to the California League for his first full season, where he has already gotten looks at third base, which may say something about what the Giants think of his arm strength. Almost 350 plate appearances into the 2017 season, Howard has shown great hand-eye with his .321 average and 15.5 K%.

2017 Stats // VIDEO // ETA: 2019

Patrick Cavey/MiLB.com

Patrick Cavey/MiLB.com

28. Dylan Davis

The former Oregon State pitcher seems to be finally tapping into the power scouts have mentioned frequently. A month into the 2016 season, Dylan Davis was slugging .536 in the South Atlantic League, and eventually promoted to San Jose where he hit nine home runs in his first 26 games in the California League. The year concluded with Davis tallying 26 home runs, a .521 slugging percentage, and a .238 ISO — the second highest in the organization behind only Jarrett Parker. Davis plays the corner outfield, and has an absolute cannon — once able to hit 97 with the Beavers. Like Mac Williamson, the pitcher-turned-outfielder, Davis' arm strength is his greatest asset, though he's bringing the bat around, too. He did, in fact, win the Cape Cod home run derby in 2012. Davis has average defensive skills and below average speed.

2017 Stats // VIDEO // ETA: 2019