Ben Sandstrom/MiLB.com

Ben Sandstrom/MiLB.com

25. Rodolfo Martinez

The Giants have another 100-mph arm in Dominican right-hander Rodolfo Martinez, who rolled through the California League and was promoted to Richmond at the end of June 2016. Martinez faced 124 batters in 32 games with the San Jose Giants and gave up just six extra-base hits while owning a 0.88 ERA. Martinez comes at hitters with explosive arm speed, making his upper-90s and often 100-mph four-seam fastball a plus, maybe even plus-plus offering. He features two average to below-average secondary pitches, including a low-80s slider with 11-5 movement and an upper-80s changeup that certainly will need some improvement.

2016 Stats // VIDEO // ETA: 2018

Conner Penfold/Giant Potential

Conner Penfold/Giant Potential

26. Tyler Rogers

Tyler Rogers is not your average right-handed reliever. As the accompanying image demonstrates, Rogers is a submariner. And he's very good at it. The 25-year-old from Austin Peay State drops ridiculously low, making it difficult for right-handed hitters, though his splits aren't terribly lopsided. Opposing batters averaged just .208 off him in San Jose/Richmond in 2015, with a .191 mark versus righties and .230 against lefties. Rogers, whose twin is in Minnesota's system, reached Triple-A in Sacramento by June of 2016, fueled by a 32-inning streak to begin the new year in Richmond with a 0.00 ERA and a WHIP just below one.

2016 Stats // VIDEO // ETA: 2017

Jared Ravich/MiLB.com

Jared Ravich/MiLB.com

27. Heath Quinn

The Giants wasted no time stocking up on more outfield talent beyond Bryan Reynolds, grabbing Samford University's Heath Quinn in the third round, 105th overall. Quinn didn't last in the Arizona League long after being drafted, being sent to Salem-Keizer after just two games like most polished college hitters of his stature. Quinn shows a balanced approach at the plate, using both sides of the field while remaining patient in the box, as well. His speed on the base paths is average, which is just fine, while Quinn displays well above-average skills in terms of arm strength and accuracy from the corner outfield. A good comp would be Mac Williamson with more consistent contact but less power.

2016 Stats // VIDEO // ETA: 2020

MiLB.com

MiLB.com

28. Ronnie Jebavy

After grinding through the first 26 games of the 2016 season in San Jose, where he batted just .181 and struck out 31 percent of the time, Ronnie Jebavy has turned practically everything around and showed exactly what he's capable of bringing to a pro team. Jebavy is first and foremost a stellar defensemen and way-above average baserunner. His plus-plus speed helps him get to plenty of fly balls playing center field, coupled with an accurate and strong arm. He's a potent base stealer, and will beat out numerous throws for infield singles with consistent times to first base below 4.10 from the right side. With his bat, Jebavy is pretty average. His defense and speed will aid him in reaching the majors.

2016 Stats // VIDEO // ETA: 2019