Buck Davidson/MiLB.com

Buck Davidson/MiLB.com

29. Ryder Jones

Ryder Jones, still just 22, is set to make his Triple-A debut alongside draftmate Christian Arroyo in 2017. At no point have Jones' numbers ever been impressive. Aside from his rookie season in the AZL, Jones has not eclipsed more than 90 in wRC+ and has a career OPS of .680 — both below average marks. But one could look at Jones' 2016 campaign and see some positives. Take for example his 15.4 percent strikeout rate, which is improved from 18.5% in 2015 and 22.1% in 2014. Or his Fall League performance just months ago, where Jones slashed .302/.380/.429 against some of the best pitching prospects in baseball. Jones and his raw power could really shine in the Pacific Coast League and open some eyes just steps from the major leagues, but will he stick at at third or move to first?

2016 Stats // VIDEO // ETA: 2018

Andy Grosh/MiLB.com

Andy Grosh/MiLB.com

30. Hunter Cole

Hunter Cole seemed to have regressed since his promotion to Richmond last season, that was until he destroyed June with seven home runs and 10 doubles, culminating in a .653 slugging percentage. While teammate Austin Slater had success against Double-A pitching, Cole took a while to get into his groove, but finished 2016 slashing .271/.319/.420. Moving forward, scouts like Cole's bat speed and power, as well as his ability to play many defensive positions. In 2016, he played every spot on the diamond except shortstop and catcher.

2016 Stats // VIDEO // ETA: 2018

MiLB.com

MiLB.com

31. Gio Brusa

Gio Brusa was one of two switch-hitting outfielders selected by San Francisco during the 2016 draft, and while Reynolds brings stellar outfield defense and a more pure-hitting style, Brusa provides the power. He won the Northwest League Home Run Derby in 2016 and finished second in the league (to his own teammate, Heath Quinn) in ISO with a 232 mark as well as fourth in slugging at .495. He struggled from the right side of the plate, slashing .219/.278/.370 but in half of the plate appearances. Grouped with Reynolds and Quinn in San Jose for 2017, the trio could combine for 70 home runs, if healthy.

2016 Stats // VIDEO // ETA: 2020

Tim Cattera/MiLB.com

Tim Cattera/MiLB.com

32. Dillon Dobson

Making it on the national spotlight thanks to Will Clark's shoutout back in June was first baseman Dillon Dobson. Roger Munter of McCovey Chronicles' "Minor Lines" kept mentioning the pop in Dobson's bat when we spoke at spring training last year, and Dobson sure proved him right with the six home runs he put up in April playing for the Augusta GreenJackets. Things cooled off for a bit for the 22-year-old from Appalachian State, but a solid 124 wRC+ in 439 plate appearances had him near the top echelon of Giants' minor leaguers offensively in 2016. Dobson's left-handed swing is smooth and consistent, but will have to prove itself facing more advanced pitching as seasons progress.

2016 Stats // VIDEO // ETA: 2020