MiLB.com

MiLB.com

33. Garrett Williams

Like his fellow 2016 draftee Matt Krook, Oklahoma State's Garrett Williams features an impressive fastball and curveball from the left side. But in his debut season, he struggled to control his stuff and issued walks at an alarming rate, though not as alarming as Krook. Williams averaged just under five walks per nine innings in Salem-Keizer. With the fastball, Williams sits in the mid-90s and gets up to around 97 at times. The curveball is an upper-70s offering but is described as a "hammer." All from a 3/4 arm slot, Williams will need to refine his control and develop the changeup, which is currently the third of his three pitches.

2016 Stats // ETA: 2021

Ben Sandstrom/MiLB.com

Ben Sandstrom/MiLB.com

34. Rodolfo Martinez

The Giants have another 100-mph arm in Dominican right-hander Rodolfo Martinez, who rolled through the California League and was promoted to Richmond at the end of June 2016. Martinez faced 124 batters in 32 games with the San Jose Giants and gave up just six extra-base hits while owning a 0.88 ERA. Martinez comes at hitters with explosive arm speed, making his upper-90s and often 100-mph four-seam fastball a plus, maybe even plus-plus offering. He features two average to below-average secondary pitches, including a low-80s slider with 11-5 movement and an upper-80s changeup that certainly will need some improvement. But what has dropped him so far on the list? A disastrous 2016 campaign, where Martinez saw his K% drop seven percent and his BB% rise six percent.

2016 Stats // VIDEO // ETA: 2018

Tim CatteraMiLB.com

Tim CatteraMiLB.com

35. Ryan Howard

Ryan Howard got bumped up to San Jose alongside the likes of Reynolds, Quinn, and Brusa to begin the 2017 season — a typical Giants move when the organization is impressed with a high-round college pick. Howard was pretty average in his debut in Salem-Keizer, posting a 92 wRC+ and .323 wOBA in 246 plate appearances. Encouraging was his sub-10 percent strikeout rate. He'll take that to the California League for his first full season, where he has already gotten looks at third base, which may say something about what the Giants think of his arm strength.

2016 Stats // VIDEO // ETA: 2020

Jared Ravich/MiLB.com

Jared Ravich/MiLB.com

36. Kevin Rivera

Out of the Carlos Beltran Baseball Academy in Miami, Fla., second baseman Kevin Riveraerupted in 2016 for the Salem-Keizer Volcanoes. He slashed .320/.352/.435, while providing some other nice metrics, as well, like a .370 wOBA and a 120 wRC+. The wOBA mark was 12th best in the Northwest League. Rivera played every inning for the Volcanoes at second base, and was drafted specifically as a second baseman, so expect to see him there pretty much permanently. As most young hitters do, the 20-year-old Rivera will be tested in the South Atlantic League, where he'll fight to earn time in an infield that includes Kelvin Beltre, Manuel Geraldo, and Brandon Van Horn.

2016 Stats // ETA: 2021