Brian McLeod/MiLB.com

Brian McLeod/MiLB.com

33. Dillon Dobson

Making it on the national spotlight thanks to Will Clark's shoutout back in June was first baseman Dillon Dobson. Roger Munter of McCovey Chronicles' "Minor Lines" kept mentioning the pop in Dobson's bat when we spoke at spring training this year, and Dobson sure proved him right with the six home runs he put up in April playing for the Augusta GreenJackets. Things have cooled off for a bit for 22-year-old from Appalachian State, but a solid 117 wRC+ through 365 plate appearances has him near the top echelon of Giants' minor leaguers offensively. Dobson's left-handed swing is smooth and consistent, but will have to prove itself facing more advanced pitching as seasons progress.

2016 Stats // VIDEO // ETA: 2020

Tim Cattera/MiLB.com

Tim Cattera/MiLB.com

34. Reyes Moronta

This stocky Dominican right-hander got a look in the Northwest League as a 20-year-old in 2013 and struggled. He was demoted back to the Arizona League for 2014, and since, has struck out 155 batters in 110.1 innings. He's had a breakout year in 2016 in the California League, especially from May 4 and on, where he has allowed just under one hit per two innings and given up only two extra-base hits over a 32-game stretch. He's been a lethal late-inning threat with his explosive mid-to-upper 90s fastball and mid-80s slider, but will get tested in the upper minors as more experienced hitters face what has been at times a below-average command pitcher.

2016 Stats // ETA: 2019

Conner Penfold/Giant Potential

Conner Penfold/Giant Potential

35. Cory Taylor

Cory Taylor hasn't seemed to run into any problems pitching in the South Atlantic League in his first full-season. He quickly built a reputation of throwing six or more innings with 90 or more pitches on a regular basis, while striking out just over one batter per inning on average. The big right-hander sits comfortably between 88 and 93 miles per hour with his two and four-seam fastballs, and has been known to reach back to touch mid-90s. He throws two types of breaking balls, but most often a slider in the low-80s with sharp bite. Taylor messes with a changeup, but is mostly a two-pitch guy. The former Dallas Baptist ace is definitely a prospect on the rise.

2016 Stats // VIDEO // ETA: 2019

Kevin Pataky/MiLB.com

Kevin Pataky/MiLB.com

36. Ryder Jones

Ryder Jones didn't really do anything special in 2014 — his sophomore campaign in the pros after being selected in the second round a year earlier. Most notably, he was demoted to Salem-Keizer in late July. On the bright side, Jones is still just 22, and more than two and a half years younger than the average player in the Eastern League in 2016. And since the tough 2014 season, he's improved immensely. After striking out 22.1 percent of the time with a .351 slugging percentage that year, his strikeout rate dropped to 18.5 in 2015 with San Jose and is now down to 14.4 with the Flying Squirrels in late July. The pop seems to have come around for Jones and his bat in terms of power, as he's set to post career-highs in home runs and doubles.

2016 Stats // VIDEO // ETA: 2018