Conner Penfold/Giant Potential

Conner Penfold/Giant Potential

37. D.J. Snelten

Like Joan Gregorio, D.J. Snelten is 6'7" and utilizes his height to attack hitters from a 3/4 arm slot. Snelten reaches back for a mid-90s sinking fastball that typically sits between 92 and 94. He drops any where from 10 to 15 miles per hour when throwing his changeup, which he uses against right-handers. The offering to lefties is a low-to-mid 80s slider that is actually more vertical than side-to-side. His command is solid, though certainly not as polished as Andrew Suarez or Ty Blach from the left side. Most scouts tended to see Snelten as a reliever moving forward, and they were right as the Giants moved him into the pen at the beginning of July 2016. The Flying Squirrels will benefit from Snelten's multi-inning ability, as well as his more consistent delivery in 2017.

2016 Stats // VIDEO // ETA: 2019

Conner Penfold/Giant Potential

Conner Penfold/Giant Potential

38. Tyler Cyr

I first noticed Fremont, Calif. native Tyler Cyr in spring training of 2016, where he topped out at 96 mph while sitting comfortably in the 92-94 range. Utilizing a curveball and changeup, all with a bit of funk in his delivery, Cyr tore through the South Atlantic League in 2016. He rocked a wildly impressive 31.9 strikeout percentage alongside a 7.8% walk rate. He held hitters to a .197 batting average and allowed just one home run in 50.2 innings. Not bad for a guy who didn't begin pitching until college at Embry-Riddle. He was promoted to San Jose in late June, and naturally the California League inflated his numbers a bit, but he still maintained a well above-average strikeout rate at 26.4%. Cyr will take on the Eastern League with the Richmond Flying Squirrels in 2017.

2016 Stats // VIDEO // ETA: 2019

Conner Penfold/Giant Potential

Conner Penfold/Giant Potential

39. Conner Menez

Conner Menez was one of two players drafted by the Giants in 2016 from the small NAIA school in north Los Angeles County — The Master's University. Menez is a bonafide starting pitcher, featuring four, even five solid offerings. His low-90s fastballs either cut or run, depending on the grip, while his three secondary offerings are highlighted by a sweeping, sharp slider that Menez is confident throwing to the back foot of right-handers. At times, Menez seems to struggle being too hittable. He rarely walks hitters but surrenders on average one hit per inning. These numbers should improve as he rises through the ranks and enjoys better defenders playing behind him.

2016 Stats // VIDEO / ETA: 2020

Andy Grosh/MiLB.com

Andy Grosh/MiLB.com

40. Matt Gage

Let-handed starter Matt Gage led all Giants' starting pitchers in the upper minors with a 2.81 FIP in 2016, and was fourth overall in the entire organization. He was so good in Double-A that his numbers were comparable, and at times better than No. 1-ranked prospect Tyler Beede over the course of last year. Still, Gage isn't quite as polished of a starting pitcher as other top guys in the system, and many scouts continue to project him as a reliever if he reaches the major leagues. He features a two-seam fastball, a slider, and a changeup. Repeating, for some reason, in Richmond to begin 2017, Gage could be a mid-season promotion candidate.

2016 Stats // VIDEO // ETA: 2018