Andy Grosh/MiLB.com

Andy Grosh/MiLB.com

37. Matt Gage

Left-handed starter Matt Gage led all Giants' starting pitchers in the upper minors with a 2.81 FIP in 2016, and was fourth overall in the entire organization. He was so good in Double-A that his numbers were comparable, and at times better than No. 1-ranked prospect Tyler Beede over the course of last year. Still, Gage isn't quite as polished of a starting pitcher as other top guys in the system, and many scouts continue to project him as a reliever if he reaches the major leagues. He features a two-seam fastball, a slider, and a changeup. Repeating, for some reason, in Richmond to begin 2017, Gage finally got his well-deserved promotion in June to Sacramento. Gage, like Dan Slania, won't wow you with strikeout stuff but pitches to contact for effectiveness. 

2017 Stats // VIDEO // ETA: 2018

Conner Penfold/Giant Potential

Conner Penfold/Giant Potential

38. Dusten Knight

Dusten Knight has emerged from anonymity in 2017 thanks to his exposure at higher levels of the minors, which he received largely in part to the 24 strikeouts and one walk he put up in 16.1 innings with San Jose to begin the year. The organization sent him past Richmond to Triple-A Sacramento, where naturally he has struggled a bit but overall has shown a lot of promise. Knight works with a low-90s fastball and a solid low-80s changeup, but really opens eyes with a straight-down, mid-70s curveball that has been his go-to strikeout pitch. He's kept Pacific Coast League hitters to a .206 batting average since his call-up, totaling 39.2 innings.

2017 Stats // VIDEO // ETA: 2018

Conner Penfold/Giant Potential

Conner Penfold/Giant Potential

39. Tyler Cyr

I first noticed Fremont native Tyler Cyr in spring training of 2016, where he topped out at 96 mph while sitting comfortably at 92-94. Utilizing a curveball and changeup, all with a bit of funk in his delivery, Cyr tore through the South Atlantic League in 2016. He rocked a wildly impressive 31.9 K% alongside a 7.8 BB%. He held hitters to a .197 batting average and allowed just one home run in 50.2 innings. Not bad for a guy who didn't begin pitching until college at Embry-Riddle. He was promoted to San Jose in late June, and naturally the California League inflated his numbers a bit, but he still maintained a well above-average K% at 26.4%. Cyr has taken on the Eastern League with the Richmond Flying Squirrels in 2017 and has remained impressive despite a slight uptick in walks and hits.

2017 Stats // VIDEO // ETA: 2018

Tim Cattera/MiLB.com

Tim Cattera/MiLB.com

40. Tyler Rogers

Tyler Rogers is not your average reliever. As the accompanying image demonstrates, Rogers is a submariner. And he's very good at it. The 26-year-old from Austin Peay State drops ridiculously low, making it difficult for right-handed hitters, though his splits aren't terribly lopsided. Opposing batters averaged just .208 off him in San Jose/Richmond in 2015, with a .191 mark versus righties and .230 against lefties. Rogers, whose twin is in Minnesota's system, reached Triple-A in Sacramento by June of 2016, fueled by a 32-inning streak to begin the new year in Richmond with a 0.00 ERA and a WHIP just below one. Rogers is a ground ball expert, averaging 77.8% with Richmond 2016, and above 65.0% with Sacramento. He's definitely a September call-up possibility.

2017 Stats // VIDEO // ETA: 2017