Kevin Pataky/MiLB.com

Kevin Pataky/MiLB.com

37. Dan Slania

A late-inning reliever for most of his baseball life, Dan Slania moved into a starting pitcher role mid-2016, and has made the Giants look like geniuses with his numbers thus far. In 10 starts since the role switch, Slania has thrown more than 80 pitches eight times, and thrown more than 90 pitches six times, while averaging six innings per start and just 6.7 hits per nine innings. Slania uses a low-to-mid-90s fastball, as well as a cutter and a slider. The cutter can touch 91-92 but typically is a high-80s pitch, while the slider sits 81-85. Almost all of his already-solid numbers have improved since becoming a starter. What a story Slania could be over the next couple years.

2016 Stats // VIDEO // ETA: 2018

Conner Penfold/Giant Potential

Conner Penfold/Giant Potential

38. Johneshwy Fargas

To start things off, this Puerto Rican speedster has an 80-grade first name. Pronounced "joan-ESH-wee," Johneshwy Fargas lit up the base paths in 2015 with the Augusta GreenJackets, stealing 59 bases while batting .278 with 114 hits in 102 games. Fargas is a gap-to-gap type guy that is looking for second base on every base hit, and third base on every double. He shows okay plate discipline, but is overall still a work-in-progress at the plate. Still just 21, Fargas should mature and grow immensely over the next two years and could evolve into a fifth outfielder. His defense and speed are currently his best assets, and it was his lagging bat that sent him on a demotion back to Augusta at the end of May.

2016 Stats // VIDEO // ETA: 2020

Jared Ravich/MiLB.com

Jared Ravich/MiLB.com

39. Melvin Adon

There was a good amount of hype surrounding Melvin Adon at the beginning of the 2016 season, and for good reason. Talk of a 100-mph starting pitcher is always exciting, and though he hasn't been posting triple digits regularly, if at all, in 2016 with the Salem-Keizer Volcanoes, there's certainly a lot to like about this raw arm. Fangraphs had him 94-97 in May with a mid-80s slider, featuring some nice horizontal movement, and an upper-80s, below-average changeup. Signed as a 20-year-old in 2014, Adon skipped the Arizona League after one year in the Dominican Republic. He's a project with a ton of potential at this point, but the Giants' farm system is known for handling these situations with ease.

2016 Stats // VIDEO // ETA: 2020

Conner Penfold/Giant Potential

Conner Penfold/Giant Potential

40. D.J. Snelten

Like Joan Gregorio, D.J. Snelten is 6'7" and utilizes his height to attack hitters from a 3/4 arm slot. Hailing from the University of Minnesota, Snelten reaches back for a mid-90s sinking fastball that typically sits between 90 and 93. He drops any where from 10 to 15 miles per hour when throwing his changeup, which he uses against right-handers. The offering to lefties is a low-to-mid 80s slider that is actually more vertical than side-to-side. His command is solid, though certainly not as polished as Andrew Suarez or Ty Blach from the left side. Most scouts tended to see Snelten as a reliever moving forward, and they were right as the Giants moved him into the pen at the beginning of July.

2016 Stats // VIDEO // ETA: 2019