Ben Sandstrom/MiLB.com

Ben Sandstrom/MiLB.com

5. Chris Shaw

One of the most coveted types of baseball players is the big, left-handed, power-hitting first baseman. Chris Shaw is that. Recognized widely as the best collegiate power hitter in the 2015 draft, Shaw was taken in the supplemental first round and debuted with Salem-Keizer weeks later with that strength on full display. He clubbed 12 home runs and 11 doubles in 200 plate appearances, slugging .551. He's shown the ability to draw walks, and doesn't strike out as much as the stereotypical homer-happy first baseman. His lack of speed means he's stuck at the first base position, where he fielded with 97% accuracy with the Volcanoes. Shaw raked 16 home runs and 22 doubles in 300 plate appearances with San Jose before his call-up to Double-A. He's probably the most likely trade chip on the farm.

2016 Stats // VIDEO // ETA: 2018

6. Phil Bickford

The 2015 first-round pick of the Giants anchored the Augusta GreenJackets rotation in his first full season before promoting to San Jose. Hailing from the same college that produced Bryce Harper, Phil Bickford hammers fastballs, both types, consistently in the low-to-mid 90s and can sometimes touch 97-98 when he reaches back. The four-seam is clearly his best pitch, and appears "invisible" at times thanks to Bickford's deceptive, quick arm action. What will determine whether he reaches the highest ranks as a starter or reliever is his improvement of secondary offerings. His slider has improved in 2016, but the changeup is still somewhat of a question mark.

2016 Stats // VIDEO // ETA: 2019

Ralph Thompson/MiLB.com

Ralph Thompson/MiLB.com

7. Clayton Blackburn

Clayton Blackburn is a bonafide finesse pitcher. The Oklahoma high-school product has displayed a balanced approach of, at times, five different pitches in his five minor league seasons. He throws predominantly a two-seam fastball/curveball/changeup combination, with the two-seam and changeup both having good downward, sinking action. He evolved a project cutter into a slider that he now uses consistently. The 12-6 curve is his best pitch, and it continues to improve. Blackburn lives in the lower part of the zone, and while he can show strikeout material, his game is producing ground balls. His Triple-A debut in 2015 at age 22 was remarkable, leading the PCL in ERA at 2.85. The path from Sacramento to San Francisco is short for Blackburn.

2016 Stats // VIDEO // ETA: 2016

Jimmy Durkin/SJ Mercury News

Jimmy Durkin/SJ Mercury News

8. Lucius Fox

Long way to go for 19-year-old Lucius Fox, who got a tough, yet confident assignment to the Augusta GreenJackets for his first pro season. Athleticism is his greatest asset, which translates to make other aspects of his game well above-average. His plus speed allows him to reach usually unreachable ground balls as a shortstop, as well as be a potent base stealer. However, some say his quickness doesn't correlate as well as it should in terms of defense. Some even see outfield in his future. His development over the next two to three years should straighten those opinions out. Fox is a switch hitter, and displays slightly better power from the left side, but otherwise both sides are comparable.

2016 Stats // VIDEO // ETA: 2020