Ben Sandstrom/MiLB.com

Ben Sandstrom/MiLB.com

9. Steven Duggar

The emergence of Steven Duggar, as well as the drafting of three outfielders in their top five picks in 2016, has the San Francisco Giants' farm of outfielders suddenly going from desolate to thriving. Duggar skipped Augusta, much like Austin Slater, and joined the San Jose Giants for the 2016 season where he displayed above-average contact, power, and plate discipline. Midway through the year, Duggar led the entire Giants' farm in walks, was tied for the most triples, and was in the top-10 in wOBA and wRC+. Duggar is known for his plus speed, both offensively and defensively, but hasn't utilized it on the base paths as a pro. Duggar, along with Chris Shaw and C.J. Hinojosa, were all promoted to Double-A on the same day (June 29). Expect a Sacramento assignment when he returns from injury.

2016 Stats // VIDEO // ETA: 2018

Conner Penfold/Giant Potential

Conner Penfold/Giant Potential

10. Heath Quinn

The Giants wasted no time stocking up on more outfield talent beyond Bryan Reynolds, grabbing Samford University's Heath Quinn in the third round, 105th overall. Quinn didn't last in the Arizona League long after being drafted, being sent to Salem-Keizer after just two games like most polished college hitters of his stature. How's a .461 wOBA in the Northwest League combined with a 234 ISO? Quinn was a beast. He shows a balanced approach at the plate, using both sides of the field while remaining patient in the box, as well. His speed on the base paths is average, which is just fine, while Quinn displays well above-average skills in terms of arm strength and accuracy from the corner outfield. A good comp would be Mac Williamson with more consistent contact but less raw power.

2016 Stats // VIDEO // ETA: 2019

Tim Cattera/MiLB.com

Tim Cattera/MiLB.com

11. Steven Okert

Steven Okert was poised to be the new Javier Lopez when Javy strutted off the mound for the last time as a Giants reliever. That was until Will Smith was acquired. But even with Smith's injury, Okert was assigned to Sacramento to begin 2017. He's still more like Lopez than Smith is, swinging across his body with a jerky, low-three-quarter release. Okert is dominant against left-handers with his mid-90s fastball, sharp-biting slider, and changeup. Fellow lefty Josh Osich taught Okert his change, which he is using as a weapon against right-handers. A 2014 Fall League graduate, Okert is as close to the bigs as anyone. Expect to see him bounce between Sacramento and San Francisco until becoming a permanent staple in the big-league bullpen.

2016 Stats // VIDEO // ETA: 2017

Kevin Pataky/MiLB.com

Kevin Pataky/MiLB.com

12. Sam Coonrod

Drafted out of Southern Illinois in the 5th round of 2014's draft, Sam Coonrod emerged onto the top prospect scene in 2015 with breakout numbers for Class-A Augusta. You'll notice a bit of uniqueness to his delivery, beginning a bit slower and then exploding off the mound toward hitters. This makes his mid-90s fastball, with some sink, appear quicker, which he then counters with an above-average slider than breaks hard almost straight down. He continues to develop his changeup — a pitch that may ultimately decide whether he remains in the rotation or moves to the bullpen. At age 23, Coonrod proved to be too advanced for the California League, promoting to Double-A Richmond on June 17.

2016 Stats // VIDEO // ETA: 2018