Version: April 2016 | Click here for latest version.


Conner Penfold/Giant Potential

Conner Penfold/Giant Potential

1. Tyler Beede

The 2014 NCAA national champion Tyler Beede is the second most recent of the Giants' first-round selections. He remarkably gained 25 pounds of body weight after his freshman year at Vanderbilt, sitting now at 6'3", 210 pounds. The weight increase helped his fastball velocity rise into the mid-90s. He scrapped the four-seam fastball in 2015 before resurrecting it this spring — an important key to his future success. Beede throws a slider in the 82-84 range, a high-80s cutter, as well as two deceptive changeups, which he says he throws with differing grips to lefties and righties. Beede lives in the strike zone, and with steady improvement of that command, he's the next future star of the Giants' rotation.

2016 Stats // VIDEO // ETA: 2017

Kevin Pataky/MiLB.com

Kevin Pataky/MiLB.com

2. Christian Arroyo

2014's first and second-round picks Christian Arroyo and Ryder Jones received aggressive promotions to the Augusta GreenJackets to begin 2014. After hyperextending his thumb in May, on top of a sub-par start, Arroyo was demoted to Salem-Keizer where he regained his swagger. He displayed the type of gap-to-gap power that allowed him to slug an Arizona League-leading .511 in 2013. He tore up the California League in his second full season, posting a .304/.344/.459 line while fielding 96% exclusively at shortstop in 88 games. Arroyo is a bit like Joe Panik, but without the walk rates: a pure-hitting, original shortstop who may see more time at second base down the line.

2016 Stats // VIDEO // ETA: Sept. 2017

Conner Penfold/Giant Potential

Conner Penfold/Giant Potential

3. Andrew Suarez

Andrew Suarez has the potential to move very quickly through the Giants' system. The polished left-hander from the University of Miami (FL) should be pecking at the major leagues towards the end of 2017, reaching into 2018. He paints low-90s fastballs on corners and fools hitters with deceptive sliders and changeups. The slider is likely his best pitch, while the changeup shows good fade and should develop into another plus offering. The curveball is a work in progress compared to the other three pitches, but has good sweeping break. His command is advanced, like that of Ty Blach. He rarely issues walks. Think of them as very similar, but with Suarez possessing greater strikeout ability. 

2016 Stats // VIDEO // ETA: 2018