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Note: This list's order was not set by me, but by MLB.com. I've provided my video, photo and interviews as additions. MLB’s list can be found here. Click each player's name for more content.


5. Keury Mella

RHP | Augusta GreenJackets (A) | 6’2″ | 200 lbs | Signed: 2011 | 21-years old

From MLB.com: "Mella pitched five shutout innings to win the deciding game of the Arizona League playoffs last September, and his promising stuff inspires thoughts that more postseason heroics are in the future. He has one of the highest ceilings among Giants pitching prospects.

Mella's fastball stands out both for its 93-95 mph velocity and its heavy sink. His hard curveball is becoming a solid offering, and his changeup should improve once he starts using it more often.

Mella threw strikes from the moment he set foot in pro ball. If his pitches develop as hoped, he could be a No. 3 starter."

My take: Having just seen him in minor league camp during spring training, I can say that Mella is definitely raw. Still a very young, inexperienced pitcher. I assumed he'd end up in Augusta in 2014, where a lot of guys have really matured in the Giants system. I'd say he'll improve on his currently firm changeup and get some more movement, as well as velocity taken off of it. His mid-90s sinker has really put him on the map, though. To have that kind of heavy sink at age-20 is special. 


6. Ty Blach

LHP | Richmond Flying Squirrels (AA) | 6’1″ | 210 lbs | 2012, 5th round | 24-years old

Photo by Lauren Crown

From MLB.com: "Because Blach topped all NCAA Division I pitchers with 21 starts in the spring of 2012, San Francisco gave him the summer off after signing him as a fifth-round pick. When he made his pro debut last year, he starred, leading the high Class A California League in ERA (2.90) and fewest walks per nine innings (1.2).

Blach has an impressive mound presence and feel for pitching, and he also has quality stuff. He goes after hitters and attacks the strike zone with three pitches that each can grade as plus offerings when they're at their best.

Blach throws both a two-seam and a four-seam fastball, getting good sink on the two-seamer and hitting 94 mph with the four-seamer. His changeup features deception and fade, and his slider is a reliable third option. Blach doesn't beat himself with walks, and he rarely misses up in the strike zone."